CYP3.1.1 & CYP3.1.2

Topics: Child development, Jean Piaget, Developmental psychology Pages: 11 (3344 words) Published: March 25, 2014
CYP3.1. 1 & CYP3. 1. 2
During a child’s development, there are many aspects to consider. It is important to recognise each aspect, but to also remember that each aspect can overlap in many ways. The different aspects to consider are:






Physical
Communication
Intellectual & Cognitive
Social, Emotional, Behavioral & Moral

By looking at the different aspects, you can get a good understanding of the usual rate and sequence of development. Rate being the time if takes a child to develop and sequence being the order in which they develop. To break down the development stages, I will divide the stages in to the following age groups:







0-3 years
3-7 years
7-12 years
12-16 years
16-19 years

Physical
Physical development looks at the gross motor skills. e.g running, skipping, climbing and the fine motor skills e.g cutting, threading and writing. Also, it looks at the physical growth of the child. It is crucial not to assume that the physical growth of a child is just going to happen, but offer them opportunities in multiple ways, as well as, offering them constant support, so they can develop their physical aspect fully.

0-3 years
This age group sees huge physical changes. When a child is new born, their physical control is very little. However, by their third month they are able to grasp and smile to faces that smile at them. During their development in this age range, children will follow the sequence of sitting, crawling, standing, and then to walking. It is important to consider that a developing child will follow the same sequence, but not necessarily at the same rate. As well as developing physical movement, the baby will also be developing in other ways. They will go from sucking and swallowing mashed foods offered to them by their parent(s)/ carer(s), to being able to grasp a spoon themselves and co-ordinate feeding independently. In turn, this developed co-ordination is also demonstrated by the gripping of pencils and crayons towards the latter part of this age group. 3-7 years

Continuing with the physical growth development, a child in this age range will be able to strengthen their co-ordination. This helps their confidence to grow when they master new skills, (overlapping with Social, Emotional and Behavioral aspect) such as kicking a ball in to a net, running, climbing and newer skills such as skipping, strengthen. The fine motor skills are also becoming more accurate, which a child can demonstrate by now being able

to clearly write their name, (commonly their first name, surnames come later) and cut shapes with scissors.
7-12 years
Children in this age group can develop specific interests in the physical development they have previously gone through. For example, they may be interested in ball skills and develop these by way of a hobby, such as basketball, netball or football. The fine motor skills will continue to become more controlled, enabling them to play on an instrument or partake in more complicated sewing, such as cross-stitch. Many schools offer extracurricular activities set at the different key stage levels to help child development. It is possible for girls at the latter stage of this group to show signs of puberty. Boys generally do not show these signs until slightly later.

12-16 years
This age range of physical development focuses mainly on puberty. Girls follow this pattern between 9-12 and boys 11-14, however boys finish puberty much later than girls. This means that both boys and girls will undergo physical, hormonal, and sexual changes. Again, it is crucial to understand that the rate of this development varies considerably, but the sequence follows the same pattern.

16-19 years
Children in this category have developed physically into young adults and girls will have hit physical maturity. However, boys usually continue to grow well into their 20s. Communication and Language

This aspect of a child’s development is so important. Good communication...
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