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Topics: Management, Education, Conflict Pages: 7 (2664 words) Published: May 3, 2014
In order to manage behaviour effectively, a teacher must understand that they are guiding students and leading them, rather than simply being ‘in charge’ of them. ‘It takes some change of pedagogical and psychological mindset to see our power as a teacher as power for, and power with our students rather than merely power over others’ Rogers (13) This is something that comes with experience, there has to be a realisation that as a teacher trying to control a class rather than work with a class usually is not going to be a successful behaviour management technique. A teacher trying to rule a class rather than manage them can result in misbehaviour and conflict in the classroom. Chaplain believes ‘in the classroom it is the teacher who should be in control. Disruptive behaviour, refusing to work, insults and other attention-seeking tactics are attempts by students to take control. (P140) Although the teacher should be the lead manager of the classroom, controlling students is not a mind-set a teacher should have. During the early stages of my developmental placement I was very much under the impression that as a teacher I should be in control of the class. However, through working with some difficult classes, and with students with challenging aggressive behaviour I found that battling students for power resulted in wasted learning time. In order to manage behaviour effectively, a teacher must understand that they are guiding students and leading them, rather than simply being ‘in charge’ of them. ‘It takes some change of pedagogical and psychological mindset to see our power as a teacher as power for, and power with our students rather than merely power over others’ Rogers (13) This is something that comes with experience, there has to be a realisation that as a teacher trying to control a class rather than work with a class usually is not going to be a successful behaviour management technique. A teacher trying to rule a class rather than manage them can result in misbehaviour and conflict in the classroom. Chaplain believes ‘in the classroom it is the teacher who should be in control. Disruptive behaviour, refusing to work, insults and other attention-seeking tactics are attempts by students to take control. (P140) Although the teacher should be the lead manager of the classroom, controlling students is not a mind-set a teacher should have. During the early stages of my developmental placement I was very much under the impression that as a teacher I should be in control of the class. However, through working with some difficult classes, and with students with challenging aggressive behaviour I found that battling students for power resulted in wasted learning time. In order to manage behaviour effectively, a teacher must understand that they are guiding students and leading them, rather than simply being ‘in charge’ of them. ‘It takes some change of pedagogical and psychological mindset to see our power as a teacher as power for, and power with our students rather than merely power over others’ Rogers (13) This is something that comes with experience, there has to be a realisation that as a teacher trying to control a class rather than work with a class usually is not going to be a successful behaviour management technique. A teacher trying to rule a class rather than manage them can result in misbehaviour and conflict in the classroom. Chaplain believes ‘in the classroom it is the teacher who should be in control. Disruptive behaviour, refusing to work, insults and other attention-seeking tactics are attempts by students to take control. (P140) Although the teacher should be the lead manager of the classroom, controlling students is not a mind-set a teacher should have. During the early stages of my developmental placement I was very much under the impression that as a teacher I should be in control of the class. However, through working with some difficult classes, and with students with challenging aggressive...
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