The Demand for Slavery

Topics: Caribbean, United States, Slavery Pages: 3 (819 words) Published: December 9, 2013

“Keeping in mind Gregory O'Malley’s article, “Beyond the Middle Passage: Slave Migration from the Caribbean to North America, 1619-1807,” as well as materials from the lectures, describe the contribution of African-Americans, whether slave or free, to the composition of the population of the United States by 1790.  How important does O’Malley believe that second voyages, from Caribbean islands to the mainland, were in creating the African American population of the colonies on the North American continent that became the United States?  How and why do O’Malley’s estimates differ from those of other historians?  What implications may his findings have for how Africans were absorbed into mainland society?”

The New Demand for Slavery

By the year 1790, slave trade became the dominant source of labor in the English colonies, and the Caribbean. The bound labor made it to America in two different routes, and often determined their worth, but they never became more than a minority. The slave trade provided a substantial growth in the Colonies, now allowing the whites to have workers that could complete the hard tasks, undesired by traditional colonial people. The bound Africans were thought to be essential labor, which made the slave trade take off, and the importation numbers to rise. Therefore these areas, with an excessive deal of hard work, often felt that the bound labor was essential for economic growth and the United States population began to increase as the bound labor became favored.

African forced labor contributed to the population of the inland Colonies and the Caribbean, but made a different effect in each area, as stated in the lecture. As the rising need for laborers increased, so did the number of bound labor. Where the labor first began to peak, was in the Caribbean. The weather was blistering, due to the tropical climate. This made disease prevalent in place like the West Indies, which made the Europeans avoid the hard effort needed. The...
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